Tag Archives: spiritual practice

Perfection and Relation

It is all to easy to hold ourselves to unattainable standards. Especially in the world of yoga today where so often the images of physical perfection permeate much of our visual concepts and by proxy our deeper understanding of the practice. Instagram, Facebook, yoga journal, the list of images of what it’s supposed to look like goes on and on. And in the midst of the sea of perfect postures the ultimate value of the practice gets lost.

At the heart of spiritual philosophy the understanding of perfection is that all things are perfect no matter how they are revealed. However, when we look at ourselves the natural tendency is to see imperfections before sorting through the critical dialogue and seeing the innate perfection. Constant asana practice does over time generate more skill in the asana postures, but more importantly it generates a presence of mind that enables sorting through criticism, judgement, fear, and more, to arriving at spaciousness with a perspective that is life enhancing rather than depleting. A perspective that honors the way one feels before what one looks like.

Bringing attention to a more subtle value inherent in the practice is not meant to diminish the value of striving to achieve an image of beauty in the form of a pose. Rather, bringing attention to such nuance increases the capacity to experience grace where we are. And in the company of grace energy softens, the form of the asana softens, the light that shines innate perfection from the inside out radiates, and no matter the level of skill expressed in the form, beauty is there for all eyes to see. In this sense the standards of perfection that one may wish to hold oneself to become more attainable, in asana practice as well as life off the mat.

Through a practice that is focused more on the inner experience rather than the outer presentation a deeper connection to self is gained. And this is one of the greatest gifts of any spiritual practice (and yoga is inherently a spiritual practice), to gain a deeper connection to self. Not only the self that is associated to personal identity but more importantly that self that is connected to the inherent perfection of all things. Such a connection provides not only the grace that softens asana, but more palpably the grace that softens perspective in the face of the difficulties of life. This is where the practice translates. Not in Facebook likes or Instagram views, but in spaciousness of spirit and palpable heartfelt connection to the deepest perfection of an evolving animate relational world.

With Love, always, in all ways, for giving, in joy,

Genevieve