Tag Archives: practice

Everything is medicine, and everything is poison.

The climate, literally, and in a broad view of humanity and politics, is feeling pretty v(olati)ile at the moment. And so, our opportunity to discern – to really truly get honest about what is helpful and life-affirming, and what is blighted behavior – is real. As autumn’s patina wends its way into the high desert sunshine and the gardens dry, I marvel at what the last year has brought. What a story I am tempted to tell about our lineage of human relationship with each other, and the planet! And I am aware that knowing what has gone down and how it got us to where we are, is invaluable information, but that the story, which lends itself to blame and shame, is venomous, and nary helpful.

In just the right proportion, at the right time, and for all the right reasons, we can take in poison, and heal. Shiva did it, we all have. I’ve also dosed inappropriately something I thought was “good medicine”, and made things way worse. Peppermint tea isn’t actually a panacea, and neither are antibiotics, this is the premise of the medicine-poison thing; nothing is for always.

People can also be medicine, and poison. Those we learn from, whether it feels delicious or bitter, are catalyzing change. We are all medicine people if we walk with awake eyes and hearts to how we affect each other, and we are pushing poison if we walk with closed-minded attachment to what is no longer true. Life is powerful! It is no small gift of being that we incarnated with human life. Wise living strikes the ultra-fine equinox balance between healing and harming inside of each breath.

And since we’re s’posed to be talking yoga, the asanas, pranayamas, and deep wisdom teachings of the yoga are also, medicine and poison, alike. Maybe one day a posture feels magic, and another, it causes pain. The pranayamas, inappropriately used, diminish life force, create stress, and can do serious harm. And scriptures written for the climate of a few thousand years ago may not be applicable verbatim to us, today in 2017, trying to figure out how to “be ahimsa”, or “cultivate peace” in the wake of bigoted buffoons playing as world leaders. Reading the news by default negates our opportunity to focus only on breath all the ding-durn day. We can’t do both, see? It feels dangerous to pretend to “stay cool” while watching devastating images of life destroyed, and a t-shirt that says “Namaste, Bitches” doesn’t feel loving to me, but who am I to say? Prescribed snippets of media-free moments, and critical doses of stress-relief during urgent times set the tone for healing in the now, and in the ancient ways. Small acts of self-and-together-care help us to rise from the ashes of judgement that keep us all down, and move forward in equity, respect, health, and love.

This is what healing looks like. I do believe that a guiding light and divine wisdom – God – is everywhere. And I commit to making and tending a thread of personal connection (context), between individual and the vastness, or else, I’m just prescribing unrealistic and ofttimes harmful concepts and practices. Anything we learn from is a guru. Taking the reins, then – even taking power back – is a process of making choices in every moment with intention (the thread), and willingness to transform (openness and humility amidst the vastly immeasurable spiritual stew of life-altering potential) through the experience. In the brewing process, maybe we learn to put poison into context, and make medicine with our words and actions that will actually begin to heal the wounds of the past? Apply love liberally.

Blessings for this equinox time, friends.

In deep respect,

Suki Ola

Advertisements

Walk Strong, with a Gentle Heart

Current political circumstances are intense. To say the least. With blatant outright bigotry, lack of tolerance, and escalating violence it is nearly impossible to stay away from, or uninformed of, the present political environment. In such palpably contracted times one’s commitment to their yoga practice, or any mindfulness practice for that matter, must be exercised as diligently in the world as it is on the mat in order to walk strongly with a gentle heart through this crazy realm.

At times like these apathy has no place. The fundamental teachings of yoga demand attention too higher ethical and moral values. Ahimsa-lovingkindness; classically non-violence, is at the top of the list. And what is lovingkindness? In its simplest it is the pure intent to love all with kindness and care. It is easy to get caught up here. Does lovingkindness only exist for that which an individual knows and understands, resonates with and is aligned to in belief? No. Lovingkindness is the most basic notion of its value as the first Yama-precept for being with the world, (and self must be included in this) has to extend to all existence. So then the question becomes, must we be loving and kind to people who actively hate, are violent, seek out ways to harm others maliciously and subversively? Yes. If your aim is to truly practice lovingkindness or non-violence then yes, the teaching demands that you love them in the company of their faults. However, the word love and the practice of love is not synonymous with making oneself available for abuse, nor acting and speaking out in alignment with something bigger.

Mindfulness practice means using the mind in a discerning manner. In this vein to use the mind to acknowledge that while a human or a group of humans are severely misguided they are not outside the circle of deserving love. This discernment is then followed with action. What is the appropriate action to take in the face of true racist hate? When the teaching is to love? Love exists with boundaries. There is too much awareness, knowledge, wisdom, and understanding in this world to play ignorant to the harm racism, bigotry, and simply the belittling of any human for any reason. Therefore appropriate action in the company of such ignorance is to first acknowledge with love the lack of value in such awareness and behavior, and to withdraw contact with such a person until the time when they can see beyond the limited vales of their perception. To share the premise of your choice with such a person may or may not be valuable to them, but is ultimately valuable to the greater good. To do so with words that emanate from love is to act in alignment with the precept of Ahimsa. This is Sakriya-with action; one who performs one’s responsibilities; putting into effect what one has learned from their spiritual teachings. Acting with a moral compass.

To do nothing. To say, “it is all good.” To say, “I am practicing non-violence and lovingkindness and they are only doing the best that they can.” To be apathetic. To avoid confronting the ignorance for fear of making waves, especially when the hatred is espoused by someone you deem friend or family, this is Niskriya-without action; one who does not perform one’s responsibilities; one who does not put into action what one has learned.

Apathy, fear of rocking the boat, just plain old doing nothing does not cut it for the sincere yogi. Such Niskriya is far from in alignment with a good moral compass. This is nowhere near doing the best you can.

A true yogi assigns themselves to shining the light of awareness into the darkness of ignorance. Lives in their responsibility of practicing the Sakriya of love in the abyss of discrimination. From love, with love, for love.

A Yogi has a large toolbox from which they can pull the correct tool for the situation at hand. Mudras are such tools. A mudra is a hand gesture which correlates reflex reactions from hand to brain. Mudras are powerful tools which redirect energy flow. And in the case of standing strong with a gentle heart in a crazy world, mudras can bolster a yogi’s capabilities. A combination of Varada Mudra and Abhaya Mudra can be used to support and enhance a yogi’s aptitude of Sakriya in harmony with Ahimsa.

Varada Mudra is represented with the downward facing palm of the left hand. It is the mudra of the accomplishment of the aspiration to devote oneself to human salvation. The five extended fingers of the mudra symbolize respectively; generosity, morality, patience, effort, and meditative concentration. This mudra expresses not only the act of giving and benevolence, but also the act of receiving. Varada Mudra is seldom used alone and is regularly used in combination with Abhaya Mudra.

Abhaya Mudra is represented with the upward facing palm of the right hand. This mudra is not only known worldwide as a gesture of waving and salutation; it is also known worldwide as a gesture which means “stop.” Abhaya in Sanskrit translates to fearlessness, and the mudra is also one which dispels fear and symbolizes protection and peace as well as being seen as a gesture of good intentions, offerings of love, and reverence to the highest.

Together the combination of these two mudras powerfully express an individual’s capacity to simultaneously be generous with love and maintain discerning boundary. This is what is called of all humans who seek to live in the awareness that dispels ignorance in this world, at this time. This is what is called for from those who have committed themselves to the primary tenant of yoga, Ahimsa. As crusaders of awareness, as practitioners of love and non-violence, it is a yogi’s responsibility to hold the human race to a higher standard, knowing that standard can be met. To say “they are only doing their best” when one knows that they can do better if they are liberated from the veils of limited belief, is to be apathetic. Is to walk in Niskriya. This is not the time for apathy this is the time for courage. Now is the time for Sakriya. To speak and act with love and a gentle heart.

With Love, Always, in All Ways, For Giving, In Joy,

Genevieve

Hurdling the Monkey Mind

As humans it is all to easy to get myopic in our view. The minds tends to eclipse broadened perspective with the excessive cataloging, sorting, dialoguing, and chatter of the mind. Practices such as meditation and yoga have for centuries been medicine for this, and many other challenging aspects of the human experience.

Simply being in concentrated relationship with the breath enables the faculty of the mind to do what it does best, focus. The continued focus of the mind on the breath relieves the mind of its grasp on the other stories it has latched onto. Similarly, a challenging and vigorous asana practice directs the minds attention to sorting the movements of the body in concert with the breath. In essence this distraction liberates the mind from the ceaseless chatter of monkey mind.

If we sit long enough with our breath, if we practice hard enough on our mat, there is a moment of freedom. And while this moment might be fleeting, the space experienced there expands into a subtle yet sustained spaciousness that spans the course of a lifetime. If not more.

Practice is a discipline that leads to freedom. It may require hurdling the monkey mind to get to the practice. But once arrive, the gift of the spaciousness that is your natural heart space will be revealed there. Worth the leap every time. Even when your feet get caught up on the hurdle along the way!

A simple practice for these coming weeks in the epoch of eclipse season where the mind moves fast, and then faster, is the practice of sama vritti pranayama. This is a simple breath practice of inhaling and exhaling in equal portions. The basic rhythm of this breath practice enables a calmer mind and a calmer autonomic nervous system response, naturally reducing stress hormones in the body.

To practice this simple, yet profound breath exercise, begin with a comfortable seat. Take a few moments to watch your breath rise and fall in its natural, unadulterated rhythm. When you are ready inhale for a count that does not create a feeling of anguish or anxiousness, a count that you can sustain without extra or exerted effort. At the top of the inhale pause momentarily in the feeling of fullness. Exhale for the same length of your inhale. Again, pause momentarily at the bottom of the exhale in the spaciousness of emptiness. Continue like this for as long as you are comfortable. Attempt to continue beyond the agitation of monkey mind discomfort and into the spaciousness of your heart. A general marker for a beneficial meditation practice is 20-25 minutes. However, three breathes may be enough for you. The beauty of designing a practice that enhances your life is that you get to decide.

No matter what course you choose for your journey may it be a course that brings you into the light of your own innate beauty.

With Love, always, in always, for giving,

Genevieve

Contemplations on Supreme Consciousness

Everything is supreme consciousness. Supreme consciousness is as the heart of all things and simultaneously permeates all things. It is muted by the laws of maya, the veils of the koshas, and the bondage of the malas, appearing to be something other than it is. Atman, pure divine consciousness is as much a part of every living thing, as death is the fate of all things living.

Maya creates delusions of appearance. Also from maya arises illusions of reality. Such illusions are tied intrinsically to perceptions of identity, perceptions of ego, and perceptions of self in place. The essence of supreme consciousness is an eternal dance of Shiva and Shakti, the knowledge and the expression, the energy and the form, united and forever bound. In the Koshas, maya is the Shakti (the creative force of the universe) pulling us away from ourselves while simultaneously manifesting all that is beautiful about life itself.

Revealing themselves in five sheaths the koshas expressions are explained as follows. Annamaya Kosha, the physical sheath or even more literally the sheath of food. The body needs food for survival, without food hunger limits perception of the divine. Pranamaya Kosha, the energy or prana sheath is the vital force which produces the subtle vibrations related to breath and connects the physical body to its senses allowing the Atman to animate in the manifest world. Pranamaya Kosha ties perception of divine to the senses, if it is not tangible it does not exist. Manamaya Kosha, the sheath of the mind. The mind is the supervisor of information reception and distribution. Manamaya veils the capacity to clearly perceive thoughts and emotions without doubt and illusion. Vijnanamaya Kosha, the sheath of wisdom, the knower, the judge, the discriminator. In the delusion of the veil of maya the Vijnanamaya Kosha attaches wisdom to the story that is written by the outer sheaths. The koshas simply tie our identity to their veils of delusion. Liberation from these veils of consciousness enables supreme consciousness to reveal itself as the eternal center of experience and knowing. As the veils of the Koshas are lifted, perception expands.

In consort with the veils of the Koshas are the malas, the delusions of impurity. Anava-mala, Mayiya-mala, and Karma-mala all manifest in the human experience to create the illusion of finite and mundane experience. Anava-mala generates the experience of feeling incomplete and imperfect, it is the primary structure that creates the basis of the limited illusion of finite life. Mayiya-mala forms the perception of separation, the “I am alone and will always be alone” thoughts. Karma-mala creates and sustains the perception that one is unable to do anything of worth or value, that all efforts are without aim or satisfaction.

Why would supreme consciousness manifest itself hidden in the veils of such limited perception? Why would feeling incomplete and insecure be built into the fundamental principles of human being? Why would the capacity to know oneself as the essence of the nature of the supreme be veiled from consciousness by design?

It is said that the reason for human life in general is that supreme consciousness wanted to experience itself so it veiled itself from itself to be rediscovered again. In rediscovery is the revelation that generates such a spaciousness within that the amrita, the nectar of the bliss of knowing the nature of the divine becomes so sweet its flavor cannot be ignored. In revelation is connection, in connection is bliss. In life is forgetting so the dance can be done over and over again. Forget, remember, experience bliss, forget, remember, experience bliss, and on and on. The experience of the bliss becomes the incentive to stay committed to the practice of remembering. Over time the waves between remembering and forgetting get closer, get smaller, and are perhaps completely washed away when all that remains is supreme consciousness.

Additionally, when we allow ourselves to perceive everything as supreme consciousness than we allow ourselves to remember that are never really truly alone. Through such a perception we remember that we are connected by the web of consciousness, the breath of life, that from which all arises and all returns. We remember consciousness is what is at the heart of all energy and is what enables energy to align intelligently, to manifest into life forms that are more than rudimentary and single celled. We come to know without question that consciousness is what generates thought and simultaneously the energy that turns thought into action. If all of life arises from consciousness than all life is connected through consciousness. Even when the energetic imprint varies, it is consciousness that makes the imprint. So while an experience of life is so often singular, it is also an experience of consciousness as a whole, which ties all things together. Consciousness is the thread of connection, from nothing to something, from breath to action, from thought to form, from heart into the world.

Through the awareness of consciousness and the realization of deepest connection as a result of the web consciousness weaves we have the great opportunity to step out of questioning and self-consciousness and into confidence and community. The veils of maya lift, the bondage of the malas is broken, and all that remains is the supreme self. Self with a capital S.

 

With love, always, in all ways, for giving, in joy,

Genevieve

 

 

Resilience and Adaptabilty

Resilience and adaptability are an intrinsic part of nature. Weeds survive, cockroaches will inherit the earth, and water will always find its way. Unfortunately, the possibility that one can become stuck in a rut of being, obdurate and unable to be fluid like water, is as great a potential as falling in love. 

Nevertheless, life invites us to be flexible. Too much fragility and we will crumble under life’s pressure. Too much rigidity and we will stubbornly refuse to adapt with changing times. Get left behind, looking out at an unfamiliar world from an inner gaze hardened by our own stubborn shortcomings.

So much of this journey of life is a dance among paradox. Dancing between stability and freedom is the dance of liberation. Freeing ourselves from our attachments to the past and desired outcomes, yet holding the gaze steady on the intent and the motive is the recipe for a vibrant life. Despite the length of that sentence, the concept is still much easier said than done.

None of us are outside the circle of loss. None of us are exempt from desire. None of us are without needs. Life, being what it is, will test our capacity to meet ourselves in the company of ourselves, during loss, overcome by desire, with needs unmet. What we do when we arrive at thes thresholds is what becomes the fluid and flexible bouncy of resilience or hard brittle bark of unfluctuating obstinacy. The most beautiful part is that we get to decide. We get to decide how to respond to life’s undulations.

The key ingredient is knowing that responding is not reacting. Life happens. Take a breath. Connect to the deeper part of you. The part that evolved with the ever evolving universe, conscious, adaptable, resilient, and remember what drives your heart. Take another deep breath, move away from the drama, exhale. Take another deep breath, choose the direction you wish to go, take one small step in that direction. Responding mindfully to life’s unsavory as well as life’s more rich and delicious circumstances is like becoming the resilient and ever buoyant material of a trampoline. Not only do you bounce back but you catalyze movement into the future.

Regularly returning to practice returns you to your capacity to connect to your breath. Regularly returning to your practice invites deeper connection to your adaptable and graceful heart. Regularly returning to your practice reminds you of your ability to skillfully spin, twirl, and jive on the paradoxical dance floor of life. Stepping gracefully between stability and freedom, acknowledging your innate ability to be simultaneously fragile and rigid, embracing your innate ability to be resilient and adaptable, will bring you ever closer to the vibrant freedom of peace you were born to enjoy. Carry on!

With Love, always, in all ways, for giving,

Genevieve 

Perfection and Relation

It is all to easy to hold ourselves to unattainable standards. Especially in the world of yoga today where so often the images of physical perfection permeate much of our visual concepts and by proxy our deeper understanding of the practice. Instagram, Facebook, yoga journal, the list of images of what it’s supposed to look like goes on and on. And in the midst of the sea of perfect postures the ultimate value of the practice gets lost.

At the heart of spiritual philosophy the understanding of perfection is that all things are perfect no matter how they are revealed. However, when we look at ourselves the natural tendency is to see imperfections before sorting through the critical dialogue and seeing the innate perfection. Constant asana practice does over time generate more skill in the asana postures, but more importantly it generates a presence of mind that enables sorting through criticism, judgement, fear, and more, to arriving at spaciousness with a perspective that is life enhancing rather than depleting. A perspective that honors the way one feels before what one looks like.

Bringing attention to a more subtle value inherent in the practice is not meant to diminish the value of striving to achieve an image of beauty in the form of a pose. Rather, bringing attention to such nuance increases the capacity to experience grace where we are. And in the company of grace energy softens, the form of the asana softens, the light that shines innate perfection from the inside out radiates, and no matter the level of skill expressed in the form, beauty is there for all eyes to see. In this sense the standards of perfection that one may wish to hold oneself to become more attainable, in asana practice as well as life off the mat.

Through a practice that is focused more on the inner experience rather than the outer presentation a deeper connection to self is gained. And this is one of the greatest gifts of any spiritual practice (and yoga is inherently a spiritual practice), to gain a deeper connection to self. Not only the self that is associated to personal identity but more importantly that self that is connected to the inherent perfection of all things. Such a connection provides not only the grace that softens asana, but more palpably the grace that softens perspective in the face of the difficulties of life. This is where the practice translates. Not in Facebook likes or Instagram views, but in spaciousness of spirit and palpable heartfelt connection to the deepest perfection of an evolving animate relational world.

With Love, always, in all ways, for giving, in joy,

Genevieve

Love Is All You Need

 With Valentines Day lurking around the corner it seems only appropriate to touch on the subject of love. Beautiful love, healer, connector, forgiver, magnanimous in all ways. Love the mover of mountains and the soother of broken and weary hearts. 

 For many years I was personally disgruntled about the upcoming holiday, for numerous and oftentimes silly reasons. Fortunately for me, and those close to me, I am mailable and my convictions change. This inevitably leads to a change in the words I espouse which is why those in my company have found my changing mind fortunate. And to be fair, through their love and acceptance I have always been permitted the space to voice my opinions without loss of love, not always in agreement, but always with allowance. My unsavory feelings around the holiday stem mostly from a personal desire to see all hearts experiencing the expressions of love every day, not just one day of the year. This has been such an important personal conviction that much of my life has evolved out of it.

 Love has many definitions, many feelings, and many different expressions. In it’s essence love is allowing, accepting, all encompassing, and simultaneously transcends all things. The quality of love that we may feel for another person in regards to sexual desire and intimacy is classically known as Eros. Love for those that are familiar and creates a sense of closeness in your heart is known as Storge, this is the love we feel for our family or those we relate to in specific ways, like our yoga family. Then there is Philia which is the love of true friendship. Philia is the type of love we feel for our “chosen family”, those you will accept and allow to be who they are whether you are related to them or not. Finally there is Agape, this is the all encompassing and simultaneously transcendent love of the divine that exists despite changing circumstances. 

 The more aware we are of these levels of love the more capable we are of seeing our own and others expressions of love in clear terms. Valentines Day has become quite simply and beautifully a celebration of Eros, the delight that can be found in Eros, and the value of such pleasures. Forgiveness and allowance of family members despite their shortcomings and inability to be the people we believe they should be is the quality of Storge love. After thirty-five years of personal experience in this department I think this can be the hardest quality of love to cultivate in the human experience. And by proxy the most liberating and profound. Philia is a type of love that is easy to experience. It is the motivating force behind making plans with friends, answering middle of the night calls of friends in distress, reaching out to a friend you haven’t spoken to in years. Philia is a branch of love that adds deep texture and quality to our lives in the presence of changing intimate relationships and challeng and loss in relationships with blood family members. Agape is the quality of love that created a planet where life thrives in concert with itself. Agape is the force of love that reminds us no matter our shortcomings and transgressions no one is outside the circle of deserving love. Agape is the force of love that witnesses our birth and embraces us in our last breath without conditions of where we have come from or where we are going. 

Through awareness of love and of our relationship to love at these levels we can relate to others through love with greater skill. Stewarding the earth in gratitude for her generosity. Contributing to the greater good in our daily activities and work through the lens of true friendship. Honoring those we don’t understand as we would our family members with whom we don’t see eye to eye. And cherishing the fleeting and powerful moments of intimacy we spend with our beloveds behind closed doors with dignity and respect. These are just a few examples, and I invite you to deepen your own contemplation on the subject of love. Working always with the knowing of loves true nature, allowing, forgiving, generous, accepting, spacious, and unconditional. Through contemplation you may arrive at the realization that everyday is an opportunity to live in Love. To live in love in relationship with the whole of the universe…multiverse…and beyond!

With Love, always, in all ways, for giving, in joy!

Genevieve

Attention, Attention…

These last weeks leading up to the election I have been completely distracted. More interested in the movement at Standing Rock than the movement toward the White House. What is taking place at Standing Rock, in my eyes, is as important, if not more so, than the civil rights movement, the suffragette movement, the movement to abolish slavery, and the movement to liberate this country from the jowls of the English Monarchy. Again, that’s just my opinion…and I feel rightly so.

Life without clean water is no life at all! Mini Wiconi, water is life.

An avid fan of great novels, up on the list of personal favorites sharing space with War and Peace, East of Eden, and Jitterbug Perfume is the entirety of the Dune series by Frank Herbert. Of course like any series, some of the books are better than others, but like all of the greats this work touches on more than a plot that turns pages. Water is life after all and the Dune series navigates the reader through a conversation around the extraordinary power of water…economy, ecology, philosophy, theology, politics, love, water is the current that moves all these streams in Frank Herbert’s fictional universe, and in our natural universe as well.

I feel fortunate that my lamentation in regards to the presidential election is shared by most of those in my social circles, but I know it is not shared by all in my sphere or otherwise. So much of what happens in our elections is a generating of fanaticism for our “team”. And much like a favorite team winning or loosing a major sports title, we as fans feel fully let down or overwhelmingly elated when our candidate wins or looses. As a result of this election many of those in my social circles were feeling down and out while looking forward toward a vision they do not feel they can align with.

Walking into my favorite coffee shop the day after the election was a somber experience. A dear friend of mine who was there responded to my inquiries of her welfare by stating her desire to join the revolution of love. “Where is it?” she asked. “At Standing Rock” I responded.

What is and has been taking place at Standing Rock is a powerful faction of humanity facing a vision it does not align with and looking through eyes of forgiveness and spirit. There is nothing more beautiful and powerful than this! Dignity and self respect shine through the veils of corporate greed and corruption. Integrity with principles outshines the need for convenience and ease. Patience walks alongside fear and uncertainty. Through prayer and forgiveness a movement is gaining momentum and it is a revolution of love.

No matter our political affiliations and leanings, no matter our socioeconomic backgrounds, no matter our racial legacies, spiritual pursuits, relationship status, we all need clean water to survive. Every single living being on this planet needs water to live. The planet itself is 96.5% water.

It’s easy to turn our attention toward what bothers us, the wheels of the aggravating thoughts of our mind spin unrepentantly until we turn our attention elsewhere. I made a choice to not pay too much attention to the presidential election because my attention and my prayers have bee, and continue to be elsewhere. The roots of the word attention come from the Latin ad tandere translated simply as to stretch toward. It is an act of our will to turn our attention toward a place that is new or unknown, much like approaching a deeper asana or new relationship. The places we focus our attention become the ruts or samskaras of our minds, the places where it is easy for our thoughts to go, from which we base our observations, opinions, judgments, and choices. While practice on the mat stretches our attention with focus in the midst of intensity, the work on our mat is truly just training for the work off of our mat. So that in the midst of what life has to offer us we have the capacity to turn our attention to that which is aligned with something bigger than our ego’s desire to be right…or even to know at all. With practice we become skillful at remembering heart in the face of adversity, forgiveness in the face of long lasting deceit, and love in the face of fear.

May your practice return you to our shared experience, one of challenge, dignity, adversity, spirit, deceit, love, the unknown, and so much more. May we all join the revolution of love no matter who’s side we align too. May we remember that even though they did not win for 108 years, the Cubs finally had there day, and love too will have its day and many more that follow. May we take steps toward the salvation love offers every day through mindful attention, forgiveness, and acts of peace. And through it all, may we enjoy fresh water, clean air, and warm hugs that dispel the false boundaries of separation worn like a jersey of a sports team!

With love, always, in all ways, for giving, in joy,

Genevieve 

The Queen of Distress

A student of mine recently gave me a new nickname, the “Queen of Distress”. The student informed me, after I queried, that this was a compliment and not otherwise. I am pretty confident that the nickname came about as a reflection of the subject matter I have been unfolding in my classroom recently. All recent themes have been spokes off of the hub of adversity.

The reason for this focus in my class themes is not me working out a current personal journey through distress, but rather my continued desire as a teacher to relate the asana practice to something greater off the mat. And I am pretty sure that no matter how open, strong, or flexible someone is, asana practice invites adversity. With this in mind I often teach on the theme of rising above or navigating through adversity as the great opportunity to translate the practice off the and mat into ones life.

While I may not be perceiving my life currently in a specific state of adversity, I am aware that there is always a bit of challenge to be navigated in the course of every day. This is one of the many reasons I return to the mat regularly. Each time any of us returns to our practice we have the opportunity to reset any states of discord to something more harmonious, or to set the stage for harmony before the discord arises. Be it physical, mental, emotional, energetic, spiritual, or otherwise.

The practice of traversing adversity mindfully and with courage can eventually lead us deeper into the more esoteric qualities of our yoga practice. As we learn to navigate the rising and falling of life’s challenges we become more capable of seeing what exists in the steadiness beneath those waves. Through this lens we become more capable of discerning what is temporary and what is eternal. In Sanskrit this is Viveka, or the practice of discernment. In time our practice of Viveka enables us to experience ever more harmony in the midst of whatever life hands us, and the fact of the matter is that life will hand it to us.

So I may now be the “Queen of Distress” but I am comfortable with that. Even though I may not percieve myself in the midst of the shit today, I know I have earned the title. And I am happy to share my knowledge with others in the hopes that something helps.

With Love, Always, in All Ways, For Giving, For Peace,

Genevieve

Autumn Manifesto

Tomorrow’ s equinox is a call to harvest the year’s bounty and begin focusing on storing energy and resources for the future. I’m hearing and feeling the call. Especially up at this elevation and in this wild climate, wrapping up of annual inspirations happens at a time that also requests solid self-care and tending at the gross physical and mental levels. I know, I know, now is the fleeting and extra special opportunity to be present. I speak for myself as an act of, and in the spirit of, living the life I have been asking for. Here is my autumn manifesto.

Accept the gift and revel in the generosity of spirit that breathes into your body from the wellspring of life force energy. Do pranayama to rebuild stable space within for energy and rest. Just like the web of diversity that holds all beings together, these two apparent opposing forces are intimately linked. Know that they become one another.

Call upon the ancient asana shapes that science is just now coming forth to declare they: improve circulation, promote brain function, regulate hormones, support digestion and elimination, strengthen joints and bones, affect better lymphatic flow, promote healthy body weight, enhance sleep. The list goes on, but especially, asana allows freedom of movement in the world, and exploration. Practice because you like it.

Sit in meditation not just because it has been proven to calm the nerves, clear the mind, invite creative thinking, and foster connection to spirit, but because it makes the day easier to face. Reflect upon the benefits in direct relationship to your life. Sit. It feels good.

Study the far-out ideas, and philosophy to connect to something greater, and remember that all sacred writings are only meant to widen a lens of perspective. See a bigger picture with every mindful, grateful breath. Recognize yourself and everyone you know living their own version of the great odysseys and journeys to the depths of the soul. Stay humble and confident in the face of all our great adventures.

Quality first. Yoga improves the quality life, and so, wish for quantity of life. When the waves of radiant health are rolling, welcome more time embodied to exact positive change as in individual, and in the greater collective community. See where your gifts are needed, and offer them without draining resources of energy. Be truly generous, hold safe boundaries.

Look beyond the surface, to see youthfulness below. Tend your inner playful self and revamp a spirit of possibility. Openness to change is an invaluable skill and practice to tend it. Despite all you have endured and seen, stay curious. And practice for the sake of, and by the virtue of, just what makes you feel quite young.

With love and peace on peace day,

Suki Ola